History

FRANCOPHONE EDUCATION IN SASKATCHEWAN: IMPORTANT STEPS

 1918

  • Teaching French in Saskatchewan schools is limited to one hour each day.

 1925

  • ACFC offers French lessons to Francophone students of Saskatchewan.

 1931

  • The Education Act proclaims English as the only language used to teach in Saskatchewan.

 1944

  • The Greater School Units Act: within large school units, Francophone students and parents become more and more a minority.

 1965

  • Saskatoon’s Francophone students strike in order to obtain religious instruction in French.

1967

  • Saskatchewan’s Education Act permits regular courses to be taught in French in schools.

1968

  • Establishment of designated schools in Saskatchewan.

1978

  • The Federal Government recognizes French and English as Canada’s two official languages.

1982

  • Article 23 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms guarantees official language minorities the right to an education in their own language.

1988

  • The Court of Queen’s Bench (Wimmer decision) recognizes that Article 23 of the Charter of Rights gives  Fransaskois the right to their own schools and the right to administer these establishments.

March 1990

  • The Supreme Court of Canada (Mahé decision) recognizes the Francophones’ rights to govern their children’s education.

June 1993

  • The province of Saskatchewan adopts Bill 39 granting Francophone parents the control of Fransaskois schools.

June 1994

  • First elections of the Fransaskois school trustees in accordance with the new Fransaskois Education Component.

August 1994

  • The Conseil scolaire fransaskois de La Vieille (Gravelbourg) is first to assume full governance of its school.

January
1995

  • Seven new Conseils scolaires fransaskois assume governance of their Fransaskois schools (in the Battlefords, Bellegarde, Bellevue, Prince Albert, Regina, Saskatoon and Vonda). In August, a Francophone education program is implemented in Ferland.

August 1996

  • Implementation of a Francophone education program in Ponteix.

1997

  • Establishment of a Francophone education area in Zenon Park, election of its new Conseil and opening of its school. Implementation of a Fransaskois school in Moose Jaw.

June 1998

  • The Education Act, 1995, is amended: the Conseil général des écoles fransaskoises and the nine conseils scolaires fransaskois will make way for a single school division in January 1999.

January 1999

  • The twelve Fransaskois schools are transferred to the Division scolaire francophone n° 310 and administered by the Conseil scolaire fransaskois.

February 2000

  • The twelve Fransaskois schools are transferred to the Division scolaire francophone n° 310 and administered by the Conseil scolaire fransaskois.

June 2007

  • Division scolaire francophone n°310 changes its name and becomes the Conseil des écoles fransaskoises.
 September
2010
  •  École fransaskoise de Lloydminster officially opens it doors on September 7th, 2010 as part of the Battlefords francophone school region.
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